Thivanka Rukshan Perera  is presently the Creative Director/ CEO at Aegle Creations (PVT) Limited a leading International Production House in Sri Lanka. He is a BFA (Hon) graduate of Academy of Art University (San Francisco) in Motion Pictures & Television. His most recent work “Wild Sri Lanka – Realm of the Leopard” was broadcast on DISCOVERY (ASIA), VIASAT NATURE and USHUAIA TV in Spain. He wrote the script for the award-winning short film “Silent Letter”, which won the ‘Best Short Film’ [Debut] award at the 3rd WIFF in New Delhi, India in 2017, and was screened in the USA via SHORTS TV. His latest Production ‘Man Eaters – A Human Leopard Story’ to be distributed via Limonero Films in Spain.

When I first did my documentary on owls in Sri Lanka, I came across a very interesting owl called the “Forest Eagle Owl”, A.K.A ‘The Devil Bird’. I made two documentaries about it that went viral (“The Devil Bird of Sri Lanka” and “Voice of the Night”). In 2018, Discovery Channel in Canada  wrote to me saying that they were doing a little piece about this mythology based on my documentaries, so I gladly provided permission to use my footage.

‘For Devil’s Sake: Owls of Sri Lanka’ is about the myth of the notorious ‘Devil Bird’ of Sri Lankan folklore; the film explores the myth, superstitions and facts behind the bird, while also relating the negative affect of superstition on the avifauna of the country. It is also the first documentary to visually document the owls of Sri Lanka. “For Devil’s Sake – Owls of Sri Lanka” was screened at ‘Colorado Environmental Film Festival’ in 2015.

‘WILD LIVES SRILANKA’ is produced and directed by Thivanka Perera is a world premiere at the 2018 WCFF – New York, October- 2018. “Wild Lives – Sri Lanka” is a BLUECHIP documentary exploring the lowland forests of Sri Lanka and its keystone species, such as the Asiatic Elephant and Sri Lankan leopard. The overall narrative follows the arc of two iconic mammals in Sri Lanka, culminating with the amazing visual spectacle of the largest elephant gathering in Asia.

Diversity is good for film, as it makes the industry more equitable and opens more doors of opportunity for work. Short films do much better than feature films in this regard. The Oscar nominated short film categories in 2016 had more ethnic minority nominees than all the other major categories combined for feature films. “WatchIncolor” as the world’s leading short movie channel, we believe that if we are going to change the film industry it must start in short films, which are the most important and accessible source of new talent for the film and TV industries